Asian Pickled Garlic Scapes- Putting Up with ErinAsian Pickled Garlic Scapes- Putting Up with Erin

Until recently I had only ever seen garlic scapes used as an addition to flower bouquets. I was quite pleased to learn that scapes have so much more to offer than just aesthetic value to hipster brides’ smelly wedding bouquets… 🙂 As local chefs have been up to their ears in scapes for several weeks now, it appears as if I’m a little behind on the whole edible garlic scape fad. Garlic scapes are the shoots/stalks that grow from hardneck Rocombole varieties of garlic. At the young and tender age of 1-2 months, scapes look like curly green stalks with tightly closed buds on top. I don’t know about you, but I think scapes look alot like the creepy mechanical bug that burrows itself into Neo’s navel in the Matrix. Scapes are typically harvested in early June to avoid any nutrient loss from the eventual harvested plump garlic bulbs.

I acquired these local serpent beauties from the Wake Robin Farm stand last weekend at the Portsmouth farmers’ market. Having absolutely zero ability to correctly eyeball the number of jellybeans in the jar, I winged it and purchased a pound and a half of scapes. This yielded three VERY packed pint jars of asian pickled garlic scapes. I just finished my last jar of oh so tasty pickled edamame so I figured a similar brine with a bit more heat would work nicely. Use these pickled scapes atop a salad, in a hummus, on a pizza, or eat them straight out of the jar (caution: this may or may not be the best life choice before a date).

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Maple Pickled Beets- Putting Up with Erin
Maple Pickled Beets- Putting Up with Erin

“Thomas Jefferson was a total fox!”… Happy Independence Day y’all!

Thanks to hurricane Arthur my 4th of July was not spent at an outdoor BBQ nor were fireworks included in my evenings’ agenda. Instead the poor weather presented me with the perfect opportunity to hide away in a cafe, drink too much espresso, and catch up on emails and blog posts. The inspiration for this recipe came entirely from a jar of the über tasty Stout Oak Farm maple syrup. This syrup is a “sugar evaporation collaboration” from a variety of maple trees out of Brentwood and Kingston, NH. Aside from dilly beans, of all the things I’ve put up in the past year, beets have surprisingly proven to be the most tasty pickle variety thus far. Though not really discernible from the photos, I did actually use a mix of golden and red beets from Wake Robin Farm for this recipe. From the quick, albeit cough inducing brine taste test, I am sure that the combination of maple syrup and apple cider vinegar is bound to result in a sweet, buttery, delicious maple beet pickle.

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